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Coming Up Roses - How Color Affects Resale Value

Does The Color Of Your Car Affect Its Resale Value?

"A rose by any other name would smell as sweet" - William Shakespeare

If you think about it, the color of the rose doesn't make any difference either. But have you ever wondered if the color of a car affects its trade in value?

How People Pick The Color Of Their Car

People pick the color of their car for many reasons. It may be a reflection of their personality or the desire to make a statement about their status, and even wealth.

Colors are often chosen based on comfort, practicality and aesthetics. Some of the most popular car colors are white, black, silver, gray and red.

One of the reasons people may choose white is because it looks clean and sleek. It also has a modern look to it. Plus, white can go with any type of interior.

Black is popular because it is thought to be classic and sophisticated. It also won't show dirt as easily as other colors.

Silver and gray are both neutral colors that go with just about anything. They are good choices for those who want a sleek, modern look.

Red is thought to signify power and strength. It is also seen as a more exciting color than some of the other options.

Trending Colors

Some people choose the color of their car based on what is popular at the time. Others may want to be different and choose an unpopular color. There are also those who believe that certain colors are luckier than others.

iSeeCars recently released an article detailing Which Colors Help and Hurt a Car's Resale Value. They reported:

Highlights:

  • A vehicle’s color can have a substantial impact on how quickly it loses value, with the highest depreciating color losing nearly four times the value compared to the lowest

  • Popular colors, including white, black, and silver, have minimal impact, meaning they won’t hurt resale value but they also won’t help a vehicle maintain its value

  • Some of the most beneficial colors for retaining value, including yellow and orange, may surprise consumers

A car’s color can help or hurt its resale value, according to a recent analysis by iSeeCars.com. After comparing prices of more than 650,000 recently sold three-year-old used cars, iSeeCars determined the average three-year vehicle depreciation rate by car color. 

 “A vehicle’s color is among the primary considerations after shoppers have decided on a make and model,” said iSeeCars Executive Analyst Karl Brauer. “With depreciation being the largest cost of vehicle ownership, consumers should carefully consider their color choice–especially if they plan on selling their vehicle.”

Be sure to read the entire article here

 

Should We All Just Buy Yellow Cars?

While the numbers speak for themselves, there are other factors you should consider before jumping on the Yellow car bandwagon. Do you really want to drive a yellow car ? If the answer is no, then it doesn't matter how well it holds its value.

The same goes for any other color. If you love the color purple and it just so happens to have a good resale value, then go for it!

 

Looking for a new car?

You'll love our selection of quality used cars - they're reliable and affordable. And we're here to help you every step of the way. You won't find a better selection or price anywhere else.

We can even find that Yellow car you've always wanted.

Contact us today to learn more!



Is Your Old Car Keeping You Up At Night

Rust Never Sleeps - Is Your Old Car Keeping You Up At Night?

Have you lost sleep worrying about your old car breaking down or rusting away? Maybe you should think about trading it in for a newer model. When you do, you'll want to take steps to keep your new car from succumbing to the same fate as your old one.

Remember the better the condition of your car, the higher its resale value will have.

Here are some tips to prevent rust:

1. Check for rust regularly and treat it immediately

2. Wax your car regularly

3. Store your car in a cool, dry place

4. Avoid driving through puddles

5. Don't wash your car with harsh chemicals

6. Use rust-resistant paint on your car

7. Keep your car clean and free of dirt and debris

8. Treat minor scratches and dents promptly

 

Garage Kept Cars - Winter Warning

In general keeping your car in a garage year round is the best way to prevent rust, but there is a caveat during the winter months. If you live in an area with heavy snowfall, road salt and other deicing chemicals can splash up onto your car while you're driving. These chemicals will accelerate the formation of rust on any exposed metal on your car. You should also wash your car regularly, to remove any salt and other corrosive materials that may have accumulated on the surface.

Leaving your car parked in the garage as much as possible goes a long way in preventing rust but even that might not be enough. The best way to keep your car from rusting is to take some preventative measures. Here are a few things you can do:

Wax On, Wax Off

Another good way to prevent rust is to keep your car's paint finish in good condition. A fresh coat of wax will act as a barrier between the metal and the elements, helping to prevent moisture and other corrosive materials from coming from your car as soon as possible.

Don't Have A Garage - Cover It Up

You can buy a car cover specifically designed to repel water and keep snow and salt off your car. These covers can be pricey but may be worth the investment if you consider how much it would cost to repair rust damage. Also rust will affect the trade in value of your car when the time comes to sell or upgrade

Another alternative is to use a tarp or old blankets to cover your car when you know bad weather is on the way. This won't be as effective as a car cover but it's better than nothing.

If You Must Park Outside - Protect Your Car

The biggest majority of the time you will be parking your car in the driveway, street or other hard surface. Parking your car on grass, dirt, snow or surfaces that do not drain well can contribute to rust forming on the undercarriage, fender wells and other areas of the car.

If you find yourself in this situation try to park your car in a spot that is not likely to puddle after a rain or snowstorm. As the ground becomes soft from the moisture, mud, gravel and other loose material can pack into areas of your car that are hidden from your view. From time to time do a visual inspection to remove any build up in these areas.

Is It Time To Trade Your Car?

We know that trading in your old car can feel overwhelming. You have to find a dealer, figure out what your car is worth, and then complete the paperwork.

To make the process as easy as possible for you. We will give you a fair market value for your car and work with you to find the best financing option for your new car.

We have a large selection of cars, so you are sure to find one that you love. Our staff is here to help guide you through the entire process, so you can feel confident about your purchase.

Wasatch Auto Exchange -Best Full-Size Pickup Truck

Please Read Wasatch Auto Exchange - Best Full-Size Pickup Truck

Content provided by CarAndDriver.com

Turn any friendly neighborhood barbecue into a backyard wrestling match with this simple trick: declare your pickup king. Well guess what, brother? Being the best isn’t about who has the biggest Calvin and Hobbes sticker on the rear window. Full-size pickup trucks are America’s best-selling vehicles, and the fight among them is closer than ever.

Trucks today are capable of accelerating quicker than sports cars like the Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 and can tow up to seven tons using conventional towing. That’s a lot of folding chairs and steel cages. The truck is the backbone of America. In 2019, pickups represented over 3.1 million vehicle sales in the U.S., or more than the entire population of Iowa. Each of these trucks can handle classic pickup needs with ease, and if you haven’t already sorted yourself into the Toyota, Nissan, Ram, Chevy, or Ford camps, we’ve ranked the segment's players from worst to best to help you in your search.

  1. Ram 1500 - The Ram 1500 is king of the mountain, having bested its biggest rivals from Detroit in our latest three-truck comparison test and won another 10Best Full-size Pickup award for 2021. We’d let those accolades do the heavy lifting for us in explaining why we dig the Ram, but here are a few more reasons: The available EcoDiesel V-6 engine has the most power and torque among all light-duty diesel pickups and is fuel efficient; the interior is a step or three above the competition; and it just plain drives well. Fans of the all-black Dodge Ram can carry the dark baton with a new for 2020 Night Edition, which offers all-black exterior trim along with your choice of paint. We’d suggest, um, black.

  2. Ram 1500 TRX - The nearly 3.5-ton Ram 1500 TRX is a lot of truck, but it knows how to use it. The 702-horsepower Hellcat engine is a screamer, and despite its heft, the TRX gets to 60 mph in just 3.7 seconds, making it the quickest truck we've ever tested. Bilstein dampers underneath provide more than a foot of suspension travel, allowing its 35-inch Goodyear Wrangler AT's to droop. It's beefy too, measuring 5.9 inches wider and 3.3 inches taller than the regular Ram 1500, but inside it's just as luxurious. A 12-inch touchscreen infotainment system is standard, and a head-up display, heated and ventilated front seats, and carbon-fiber accents are available options. Many aspects of the TRX make it the greatest truck as nothing else can cruise to, climb up, and fly over whatever's ahead of it quite like this.

  3. Ford F-150 Raptor - Packed with a powerful 450-hp twin-turbo V-6 and an off-road-ready suspension with adaptive shocks to soak up potholes and landings off of sweet jumps, the Ford F-150 Raptor is just plain rad. But this is no one-trick brute—it’s nearly everything you might never need in a truck and useful. The SuperCrew is rated to tow up to 8000 pounds, so the Raptor can haul more than just ass. Its wide fenders and large off-road tires can make navigating parking lots and narrow streets a challenge; we prefer to think of them as reminders as to where the Raptor truly belongs.

  4. Ford F-150 - The Ford F-150 has been a full-size favorite for decades, and nearly 1 million F-150 pickups were sold last year. So it’s little wonder why the Ford has become ubiquitous and familiar. The fourteenth-generation Ford debuted for 2021 with a new 430-hp hybrid powertrain with 570 lb-ft of torque. That's a 30 horsepower and 70 lb-ft improvement verses the nonhybrid twin-turbo 3.5-liter V-6 for those keeping track. The hybrid powered pickup gets an EPA-estimated 24 mpg for both city and highway travel, putting it fourth overall in fuel efficiency for the segment behind diesel-powered Chevy Silverado and Ram 1500. The interior is also improved in terms of materials and ease of use. An optional Work Surface allows you to transform the front row into a work table. New variable-assist steering, standard on the higher trim King Ranch model and above, is tight and direct, and even on lower trims the ride is quiet and composed.

  5. GMC Sierra 1500 - If you can swing the new GMC Sierra 1500’s price premium over its mechanically identical, Chevrolet-badged sibling (the Silverado), do so. The GMC is simply more attractive than the Chevy. We’ve ranked the Sierra above it because the extra money seems worth it when staring both trucks right in the eyes. Like the Silverado, the Sierra has five different engines, three different transmissions, and is available in either rear- or all-wheel drive. Although there's no high-flying off-roader option like the Ram TRX or Ford F-150 Raptor, a Sierra AT4 model is available with 2.0-inches of suspension lift and other off-road equipment. Unfortunately, the pricier GMC suffers from the same unimpressive interior styling and firm ride quality as the Silverado, but the extra chrome does wonders for GM's half-ton pickup design.

  6. Chevrolet Silverado 1500 - After a full redesign, the Chevrolet Silverado 1500 doesn't feel quite as new as you'd expect. Its new body bears only a face a mother could love, the interior is mediocre, and the suspension isn’t terribly refined. Those whiffs are offset by its new 6.2-liter V-8 that can deactivate up to six cylinders for fuel savings, as well as the available turbocharged 2.7-liter four-cylinder that can tow up to 9300 pounds. The brakes offer stellar stopping power, and the four-door crew cab has superior rear-seat headroom. Chevy's also added the Multi-Flex tailgate as an option for 2021 models, making the bed of the Silverado more useable than ever. Silverados with the 277-hp turbodiesel engine in 2WD are the most fuel efficient in the segment with an EPA-estimated 33 mpg highway rating.

  7. Nissan Titan - The Nissan Titan, like the Toyota Tundra, exists slightly outside of the mainstream in this segment. It lacks engine choices—there is but one 400-hp V-8 option—which severely limits configurability relative to its competitors, and the Titan’s overall execution seems lacking. Its ride quality is poor and the steering lacks sharpness; look to the Pro-4X trim for off-road capability, but look everywhere else in terms of towing capacity as the Titan has the lowest in the light-duty class. Every model now has a 8.0-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, which is something fleet versions of its domestic competitors don’t have.

  8. Toyota Tundra - The Toyota Tundra has been around in pretty much the same form since 2007—that’s pre-Instagram if you need a cultural reference point. So, it’s old. But the Tundra offers a spacious cabin and a decent roster of standard features, including Apple CarPlay and Android Auto phone integration functionality for most models. A 5.7-liter V-8 is the only engine option, an oddity among full-size pickups, which generally offer a plethora of engine choices. The Toyota’s V-8 engine delivers mediocre fuel economy and towing performance, but the truck itself at least shines in off-road capability even in base form. The Tundra TRD Pro model adds to that dexterity with new Fox 2.5-inch internal-bypass shocks and lighter-weight 18-inch BBS wheels.

Original Source: caranddriver.com (Austin Irwin - Dec 5, 2020)

Buying Used Pickup Trucks What To Look For in Orem

Buying Used Pickup Trucks: What Should You Look For?

Buying a used pickup truck is a lot harder than buying a used car. Used pickup trucks have often lived a harder workhorse-style life, which means there’s more to consider when you’re buying a truck than when you’re buying a normal family sedan or minivan. So just what should you look for? We have some answers that can help you when you’re checking out a used truck.

Towing and Hauling

One thing you’ll have to consider when buying a used truck is just how much towing and hauling the previous owner has done. Obviously, this isn’t something you’ll need to think about if you’re buying a hatchback or a convertible, but trucks are different. If a truck has spent 50,000 miles hooked up to a trailer, it may have caused more than normal wear on the truck’s mechanical components.

Of course, one way to find out just how much towing and hauling a truck has done is to simply ask the owner. But since you can’t always count on the truth from someone selling a used car — and since you can’t always count on a dealer to know the whole story — we recommend taking the truck for a mechanical inspection before you buy it. We especially recommend this if you see evidence of a lot of towing, such as a well-worn tow hitch, a severely bent rear license plate or a cable for wiring a trailer’s brake lights.

Off-Road Use

Another thing you’ll need to consider when buying a truck is exactly how it’s been used. Many used pickup trucks lead pampered in-town lives, but some are used in fields, on farms or on ranches — exactly as they were intended to be. The problem with this sort of use, however, is that it can cause a lot of wear to a truck’s suspension, chassis and other components. To check for off-road use, get under the truck and take a look around. If you see a lot of scratches, scrapes and bent parts on the truck’s underside, it may have had a rough life off-road. While this isn’t necessarily a reason to avoid a truck, it’s certainly a red flag that may warrant a mechanical inspection by a professional.

Commercial Use?

Many trucks are bought by businesses and used as workhorses in a wide variety of applications, including shuttling around the foreman and hauling serious debris and heavy goods. Because so many trucks are used by businesses, we wouldn’t tell you to avoid a truck that’s had commercial use, but we do suggest paying a mechanic to check it over before you buy it. Businesses aren’t always as careful with maintenance as private owners, and you’ll want to be sure that no important services were skipped. Buying a used pickup truck is hard, since used trucks have often had a rough life. But if you follow our suggestions and thoroughly check out any truck before you buy it, you’ll probably end up with a used pickup that serves you well for years to come.

This article by Doug Demuro was originally published on AutoTrader.com

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